Cancer Fighting Miracle Broth - Delicious Miracle Broth
2.21.13

When a family member recently fought – and won – her battle with a life-threatening disease, it was a pot of this immunity-boosting broth that could always be found steaming away on the stove. More like an elixir – this simple, traditional veggie stock from The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen is full of immune system supporting and super-hydrating minerals. Perfect for the ailing patient or the cold and flu prone household, make free-flowing mugs of this broth a part of your yearly cold weather-busting arsenal.

Author Rebecca Katz on the Magic Mineral Broth’s popularity: It took 65 gallons, scores of attempts and a full rotation of the earth around the sun before I came up with what I eventually called ‘Magic Mineral Broth’ for my last book The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen. The inspiration was practically in my genes: I’d been raised on Jewish Penicillin—a.k.a. chicken soup—and wanted to create a delicious, nutrient dense veggie broth with amazing health properties. After experimenting like a mad scientist for a year, Magic Mineral Broth came to be.

To my delight, it became not only my ‘go-to’ broth, but that of thousands of readers, friends and colleagues. The recipe became the surprise hit of the book and I am continually delighted to hear from readers like one recent mom who swore that it was ‘MMB’ that got her teen son back on the basketball court after a bout of Mononucleosis.

This jazzed up version of MMB is a preview from my newest book The Longevity Kitchen and acts like an internal spa treatment. I’ve brought numerous herbs and spices renowned for their longevity properties to the table, notably thyme and garlic. As a dazzling hydrating broth or tea this really is an elixir of life! I’m living proof that even in the kitchen, older is wiser; it only took me 25 quarts and two months to get this broth to hit my Hallelujah button.

  • Magic Mineral Broth 2.0 - updated with herbs & spices for The Longevity Kitchen

  • Ingredients

    Makes 6 quarts

    1 fennel bulb, plus tops
    2 unpeeled yellow onions, cut into quarters
    6 unpeeled carrots, cut into thirds
    1 leek, white and green parts, cut into thirds
    1 bunch celery, including the heart, cut into thirds
    2 unpeeled sweet potatoes, washed and cut into chunks
    1 garnet yam, washed and cut into chunks
    1 large bunch fresh, flat-leaf parsley
    6 sprigs fresh thyme
    12 large cloves unpeeled garlic, cloves smashed
    3 inches unpeeled ginger, cut in half, lengthwise
    1 8-inch strip of kombu
    12 black peppercorns
    4 juniper berries or allspice berries
    2 bay leaves
    8 quarts cold, filtered water
    1 teaspoon sea salt

  • Directions

    Rinse all the vegetables well, including the kombu. In a 12-quart or larger stock pot, combine the onions, carrots, leek, celery, sweet potatoes, parsley, thyme, garlic, ginger, kombu, peppercorns, juniper berries, and bay leaves. Fill the pot with 8 quarts of water, cover and bring to a boil.

    Remove the lid, decrease the heat to low and simmer,
    uncovered, for 2 to 4 hours. As the broth simmers, some of the water will evaporate; add more if the vegetables begin to peek out. Simmer until the full richness of the vegetables can be tasted.

    Strain the broth through a large, course-mesh sieve (remember to use a heat-resistant container underneath), then add salt to taste. Let cool to room temperature before refrigerating or freezing.

    Variation: For an extra immune boost, add 8 shitake mushrooms to the stock and/or a six inch piece of Burdock root, washed and cut into quarters.

  • Notes

    Store refrigerated in an airtight container for 5 to 7 days or in the freezer for 4 months.

    Balancing the broth: A spritz of lemon juice and some sea salt, about 1/8 teaspoon of each per cup, does a lot to bring this broth to life.

    Like fine wine, this broth gets better with age. A longer simmer will increase the broth’s taste and nutrient density. You can also cut the recipe in half and make it in a slow cooker.

    Enjoy!

  • Win the new cookbook

    We're giving away a copy of Rebecca's latest book, The Longevity Kitchen! To enter - you know what to do! - leave us your comments below. The reader with the best immunity-boosting tip will win a copy of this amazing new cookbook.


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  1. I love the idea of this beautiful soup….so many powerful ingredients and I can’t wait to make it!
    When I get sick or think a cold is coming on, I usually drown myself in green veggie juices, but I’ve been wanting to figure out what the best thing would be when all I crave is warm. This soup will be perfect!

    Gina | 02.22.2013 | Reply
    • Awesome Gina – glad you’ve found it! This soup is great for just sipping on all morning instead of warm coffee or tea – very alkalizing!

      The Chalkboard | 02.22.2013 | Reply
  2. Soups are my go to when sick. My variation on “chicken noodle” uses fresh ginger, kale, carrots, shiitake or cremini mushrooms, brown rice udon or soba noodles, red pepper flakes and miso.

    Cece | 02.22.2013 | Reply
  3. In the winter, when there is so much illness floating around, I eat huge quantities of orange vegetables. I have become very adept at many ways to prepare carrots! And I have discovered many different varieties of winter squash – all of which are delicious! And if by some fluke, I feel a cold coming on, a cup of steaming peppermint tea with fresh-squeezed lemon works to ward it off.

    Sharon | 02.22.2013 | Reply
  4. I take a “flu shot”. It’s a concoction of wheat grass, lemon, cayenne, and ginger. Wards off all things of evil nature. I will add this lovely broth recipe to my repertoire to leisurely sip on.

    Heather | 02.22.2013 | Reply
  5. I have the Cancer -Fighting Cookbook and I love it because I cook like that too. The book is beautiful and the recipes are delicious. So enticing that I recommend it to clients whether they have cancer or not. Healthy can be beautiful and delicious. Would like to win her newest book!

  6. This Broth sounds amazing!! I can’t wait to try it! When I feel like I am coming down with something I start taking Super Echinacea, Keep Hydrated with green juices with probiotics mixed in and a little coconut water and rest rest rest! I also like to gargle with some cayenne pepper and warm water! Perfect for sore throats. And I find myself cooking with a lot of Garlic! Works every time!

  7. Second only to your great recipes, the best thing to boost immunity in my opinion is a good self blessing. Here is mine:

    Close your eyes and say the words below in silence in your mind; when you say the words visualize what you are saying, and then feel it:

    “May I be healthy, as healthy as I can be.” (Have a picture of your self young and healthy on your mind’s eyes, keep it there.) Then say:

    “May I be happy, as happy as I can be.” (Remember the last time you were happy and relaxed, how does it feel? Enjoy the feeling… Now, find what would make you feel happy today. Visualize it. How does it feel? Keep that image on your mind’s eyes.). Then say:

    “May I be at peace.” (Imagine yourself radiating love to people around you, to your loved ones, and to all living beings in the world that need love. Be in a giving mode.) Lastly say:

    “And, may I have a successful day.” (This is for you to visualize and feel how good it feels if all you want to do today gets done; focus on survival skills, activities, and $ matters as applicable. What would make you successful today? Visualize it, feel the success, and when you are ready say: Amen
    With love, Patrizia Materassi

  8. I have found that elderberry extract works wonders to boost immunity during the flu season. Additionally, I’m a cancer survivor who uses recipes from “The Cancer Fighting Kitchen” and “One Bite at a Time” extensively in order to keep my immune system strong. I always have MM broth around, and am anxious to try 2.0!

    Jo Anne | 02.22.2013 | Reply
  9. I like to make a spicy lemon ginger tea. Just chop up ginger root, add juice of half a lemon and a slice to get the rind in there, half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper, and if you are needing sweetness, a touch of agave. Then add boiling water, stir, and let steep 3 minutes before drinking. The heat helps to open sinuses and promote drainage, the lemon gives a boost of C, ginger and cayenne, help give that immunity a kick! It’s Super Easy, and tasty, and it keeps those lil germs at bay!

    Lauren | 02.22.2013 | Reply
    • probably better to avoid agave syrup – it’s as bad as using high fructose corn syrup. better to go with a local raw honey!

      ANA | 03.11.2013 | Reply
  10. My magic weapon is, and always will be, water. I am diligent in my drinking everyday but am sure to up my intake when I feel stress or sickness coming on. I’ve tried to start drinking lemon in my water to really help get rid of any yuck and of course boil it with some ginger when my symptoms are tummy-related.

    Madelyn Rodriguez | 02.22.2013 | Reply
  11. LOVE the Cancer Fighting Kitchen and I recommended it as a key item for anyone’s cookbook library! Used it for my friend while she battled – and won- against breast cancer. Absolutely delicious recipes. Can’t wait for the Longevity Kitchen!

    Tracy | 02.23.2013 | Reply
  12. Just recently purchased a juicer and swear by Turmeric Root! It is amazing and I can feel the difference (inflammation and achey joints gone) in hours after I make a juice with it included. I have used turmeric extract capsules for over a year now and could never tell the difference like I can in the actual raw root. The juice I make contains carrots, celery, oranges, lemon, turmeric, and ginger.

    Stephanie | 02.23.2013 | Reply
  13. Whenever I’m feeling sick, I take a few drops of a propolis tincture. Propolis is what bees use to keep bacteria out of their hives, so it has amazing healing/antibacterial properties and can heal coughs/sore throats like no other!

  14. I can’t stand the thought of throwing all those veggies away. I like this recipe, I will just alter it to make a soup instead of the broth. Let thy food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food.” -Hippocrates

    Meg | 02.24.2013 | Reply
  15. I love soups such as MMB for fall and winter to get me through cold and flu season. My trick is to buy from my local CSA and incorporate such items as miso, fermented veggies (which they carry), daikon radish, astragulus, burdock root, and other herbs and spices. I start my day with a glass of warm water with lemon. I think good nutritious food, good sleep, sunshine, exercise and mindfulness each day can help each of us get through each day.

    marsha browne | 02.25.2013 | Reply
  16. Raw chopped garlic with a broth chaser is a potent potion. Follow that up with fresh vegetable juices, probiotics and more nourishing broth, like this beautiful recipe, with a little udon and sea vegetables added to it. Oil pulling with a teaspoon of coconut oil and a drop or two of oregano oil in the a.m. rounds it all out!

    Stephanie | 02.25.2013 | Reply
  17. Can’t wait to try this veggie broth! It can be tough to find a vegetarian alternative to chicken broth that can be just as tasty and nourishing.

    To ward off illness on a daily basis, I drink a warm glass of water with lemon every morning and a citrus-y fruit. In addition to eating plenty of vegetables and fruit all day.

    When a cold comes a brewing, I always drink plenty of green-machine smoothie/juices, warm light tea, and combine it with my Persian heritage’s cure-all: steaming a turnip and garnishing it with a bit of salt and lemon, and drinking vast amounts of fresh squeezed sweet lemons (but within the hour since they are quick to turn bitter from their natural sweetness)! They are LOADED with vitamin C!

    Romina | 02.26.2013 | Reply
    • Hi Romina, when you say sweet lemons are you talking about regular lemons in the grocery stores? I use a lot of them for the days when I have a hard time eating or have the metallic taste in my mouth from chemo. Thanks!

      Kandy | 03.25.2013 | Reply
  18. My favorite go-to remedy is miso soup: quick soups in mugs with just miso + hot water, medium-bodied soups with greens and grains and miso, or hearty pureed soups with miso, root vegetables and more. All of these do wonders for your digestion and your immunity!

  19. THIS, MMB, is my go to illness/cold day/need a pick me up/quick lunch broth! Starting today. When I was sick as a child my mom always gave my Lipton Cup of Noodles with butter added (i know!!) and Old Bay. I want to give my daughters a much more healthy tradition of something warm and comforting for their bellies but something they can go back to again and again throughout their lives. Although I loved those tiny noodles, it was always more about the process of my mother caring and cooking for me that truly healed me each illness then it was the little red box of preservatives.

    I am currently going through a cleanse and can’t wait to get this broth stewing on my stove for an afternoon pick me up.

    Lindsay | 02.27.2013 | Reply
  20. I LOVE mineral broths, for their simplicity and their nutritional content. This one is the most beautiful mineral broth I’ve seen yet! I’ll be making it this week as an early morning wake up, for sipping between meals, and to boost nutrients in simple vegetable purees. YUM!!

    jane | 03.02.2013 | Reply
  21. what do you do with all the vegetables? Seems like such a shame to waste them!!

    ANA | 03.11.2013 | Reply
    • Hi Ana, You can always save the vegetables to use for a stew or other dish later in the week!

      The Chalkboard | 03.12.2013 | Reply
  22. Food as medicine. I can’t wait to try this

    Kathleen Mazurowski | 03.21.2013 | Reply
    • Let us know how it turns out, Kathleen!

      The Chalkboard | 03.21.2013 | Reply
  23. Is there some health reason not to just pull out a stick blender and make this into a thick stew? I mean I’m happy to save the veggies for a later date if there’s some way it would reduce the healing effects of the broth, but hopefully it wouldn’t!

    Lily | 03.21.2013 | Reply
  24. I loved all of the tips I have read from the generous people who took the time to respond. My best immune-boosting tip: Sleep. Along with a positive, loving mind and lots of lemon water/veggies(organic) to help me keep my “happy”

    Lisa S | 03.22.2013 | Reply
  25. I am undergoing weekly chemo treatments and have many days where nothing sounds good or tastes good. This is exactly what I have been looking for! Sounds so good. I do have a question regarding the garnet yam…could i add an extra sweet potato or just leave it out as I am not able to purchase these in my area? Thank you so very much for this recipe!

    Kandy | 03.25.2013 | Reply
    • Hi Kandy – First off, we are sending you good thoughts and healing vibes as you undergo chemo. You are a warrior! As for the broth, if you are unable to find yams then we would suggest leaving it out. However, in our experience, many supermarkets actually mislabel their yams as sweet potatoes (so confusing, we know) – so if you are able, visit your local natural foods store and ask a produce specialist to discern which is truly which!

      The Chalkboard | 03.26.2013 | Reply
  26. In the recipe, you say to add all ingredients except for the fennel. Is this a typo? If so do I add it along with everything else? Thanks for providing us with such a delicious recipe.

    Lacee | 04.21.2013 | Reply
  27. Glad to have a healthier version of a healing soup!
    BTW I’d love to have the book as well. =)

    Sandy Weinberg | 05.27.2013 | Reply
  28. After I was diagnosed with cancer, I know use Turmeric and Bee Pollen and have been healthy as a ox since! I use these two daily and when I am statring to feel an inkling of a cold, then I use twice a day. Can’t wait to make the broth. I am curious as well, why you can blend it into a thicker puree stew?

    jens | 06.08.2013 | Reply
  29. It sounds delicious, I will definitely have to try this out!

  30. Sounds amazing! I’d be interested to see how it goes in a bone broth base. I’d likely add some onions to the mix too but that’s just because our house loves onions and garlic. Astragulus might be a nice addition along with some reishi mushrooms. Only thing about astragulus is that is can sometimes drive an illness deeper but to ward illness off it’s great. I bet a nice elder tea alongside this beauty would be blissful <3 thanks!!

    Ashley | 08.17.2013 | Reply
  31. Are the left over vegetables good for any thing? Seems a waste to toss them.

    Becky | 08.18.2013 | Reply
  32. This broth sounds like just the thing with this winter that just will not let go! I want to drink a gallon of it right now.

    This may be unusual, but when my throat feels scratchy, what I crave is the spicy, salty broth from a big pot of homemade lentil soup with Indian spices.

    Chessie | 03.17.2014 | Reply
    • Let us know if you try it out, Chessie!

      The Chalkboard | 03.17.2014 | Reply
  33. This sounds like a delcious broth. I want to try it ASAP. However, I do have one question: doesn’t the heat kill off a lot of the nutrients?

    Paul | 06.09.2014 | Reply
    • Hi Paul, heat works differently with certain foods – and in some cases, actually makes the nutrients even easier for our bodies to access and digest. Let us know how you like it!

      The Chalkboard | 06.10.2014 | Reply
  34. We always keep local honey and organic apple cider vinegar around. Mix equal parts honey and vinegar together and store in an air tight container. Mix 3 tablespoons in a large glass of water and drink. It purifies the body and gets rid of toxins.

    Dee Parker | 10.05.2014 | Reply

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