1.18.18
reduce redness skincare tips

We recently reviewed a slew of holistic LA facialists (see the guide) and came across Courtney Chiusano on a recommendation from a friend.

We now affectionately refer to Courtney as “the redness whisperer”. To reduce redness that’s chronic or irritating, we refer anyone we know with skin conditions or skin situations (they’re different!) straight to Courtney.

Here are her top tips for how to reduce redness to use at home…

Avoid heat:

Regular use of saunas and steam rooms make the skin redder by repeatedly dilating the capillaries. This includes really intense exercising like hot yoga and spin classes. Also, avoid going from extreme hot to extreme cold like many rituals in Korean spas: This can cause capillaries to break.

Anti-inflammatory Skincare:

Use an anti-inflammatory skincare regimen. Stick to calming ingredients like calendula, chamomile and aloe in your facial products and stay away from harsh exfoliants (including microdermabraision treatments), rough cloths, facial brushes and at-home peels/masks that warm up. Red skin should be treated gently and washed with cool or tepid water.

Avoid red wine:

Red wine promotes redness and flushing due to its histamine content. White wine has less histamines than red, if you want to enjoy a glass of wine.

Anti-inflammatory diet:

Follow an anti inflammatory diet. Avoid spicy foods, fried foods and refined carbohydrates (white bread/pasta) and stick to anti-inflammatory foods like salmon, almonds, leafy greens and berries. Also, be mindful of how much B12 you are taking (supplements, injections). B12 in excess in certain people can intensify reddening of the face.

Avoid picking:

Any pressure on red skin can further damage capillaries, so avoid picking at the skin in any red areas.

To the rescue:

Two products I love for redness are Isun Sapphire Oil and EmerginC D-Red Emulsion.

VIP skin:

To calm redness for an event, use a calming mask like Isun Soothing Relief Mask and a cool towel compress. If possible, see a professional for a session of LED light therapy.


From our friends

Leave A Comment

  1. that is pretty great info on skin care. My girlfriend is really worried about her skin. I should share it with her. Thanks for the info.

  2. I find even 50mg of Vit B3 (Niacin or Nicotinic Acid) can cause a facial flush so I need to be avoid multi-vitamin brands which contain this. Niacinamide is ok and doesn’t cause the flush, but Niacin does so check labels. It’s a histamine thing for me so not sure I’ll ever be rid of it 🙁 I do things to heal my gut and try to keep inflammation down as much as I can. I have had success with V-beam laser sessions by dermatologist – that’s the gold standard for treating rosacea – I have this done about 3 times a year. Winter is worse for me due to the constant changes in temperature from freezing outside to over-heating inside.

    Katie | 01.22.2018 | Reply
  3. Wouldn’t it be great if these articles included recomnendations of cheap products easily available at anyone’s local drug store ? Clearly the US is no longer in recrssion & every single woman out there has a fantastically well-paid job, budget & lifestyle worthy of recording on Instagram.

    Michelle | 01.22.2018 | Reply
  4. Moringa olifera leafes/powder is a great natural way to lower histamine levels. I take it when I know I had a high histamine dinner – wine and cheese and coffee!!! Normally that would set off a cascade of health issues the next day. Now I am making sure to take 3 capsules of moringa olifera or mangosteen capsules before and after dinner sometimes with natural vitamin C and I have no histamine issues anymore. It brilliant how nature works – the hard part is to find exactly the correct information which work for our unique bodies. Still the internet is a source of inspiration!

    Danae | 01.23.2018 | Reply


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