7.1.13

We love to see this kind of recipe, pulled-up from ancient tradition into modern usefulness. Although this recipe is as simple as can be, note the ingredients required: the honey must be raw to make it worth your while!  So hit the farmer’s market and whip up a batch of this sweet and summer-friendly drink by Hannah of Nothing But Delicious.

Kompot is the younger (and friendlier) cousin of kvass, and you’re actually probably more familiar with it than you think. Most countries in Eastern and Western Europe have their own version of kompot, with the French “compote” being most similar to what we put on top of our ice cream here in America. A compote is any kind of fruit that has been cooked down with sugar and liquid. Kompot just happens to use more liquid and is served as a drink rather than a condiment. I like to think of it as the original version of fruit punch.

Unlike my recipe for beet kvass, this one is not traditional. I like to use raw honey, instead of sugar, for its smooth flavor and for the beneficial bacteria which will aid in the carbonation process. Since kompot hails from Eastern Europe, tropical fruit is not what you’ll find in a recipe from your Polish great grandmother’s box. However, I especially like making pineapple and papaya kompot in the summer because of the medicinal properties: Pineapple is a natural anti-inflammatory, and papaya can help break up allergy-related congestion.

You can make kompot out of any fruit, or combination of fruit. It should taste fresh, effervescent, gently sweet and ever so slightly sour!

Pineapple Ginger Kompot

You'll need:

32-oz glass jar with lid

Filtered water
12 oz of pineapple
1 1/2 – 2 inches ginger root
1 heaping Tbsp raw honey*

* Raw, unpasteurized honey can usually be found at your local farmers market. You will not have the same results with pasteurized honey.

Directions:

As always, sanitize your jar, lid and utensils with boiling water.

Peel ginger and slice it into 1/8-inch rounds. Chop pineapple into 1/2-inch cubes. Combine all ingredients in the jar and give it a good shake. Let it sit on the counter at room temperature for two days, or until very fizzy. Serve chilled over ice – with mint, if you’re feeling fancy.

From our friends

Comments


  1. Sounds so yummy!! Making some this weekend… I’m thinking raspberry since I have lots on hand. Do you only use fresh fruit, or would canned pineapple work?

    Merina | 07.05.2013 | Reply
    • Hi Merina, we always prefer fresh or frozen fruit to canned. If you do decide to use canned produce, always make sure to rinse thoroughly. Oh, and cheers – Tweet us a pic at @chalkboardmag or tag us on Instagram @thechalkboardmag once you’ve whipped it up!

      The Chalkboard | 07.08.2013 | Reply
  2. Hi, how much water do you use?

    Maxine | 09.28.2014 | Reply

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