2.17.17
Body Electric: Why We’re Intrigued With Microcurrent Therapy

You may have heard about microcurrent as an aesthetic treatment. It’s become increasingly popular as more and more women experience the therapy’s undeniable ability to lift, reshape and rejevunate the face and body.

We recently covered our microcurrent experience with Mila Morgan, ANP MA here in L.A. (read “The Anti-Aging Beauty Treatment That Could Replace Botox“), but there is more to the story on this unusual treatment than just the mini-face lift effect.

At a cellular level, our bodies produce electricity. It’s a medical fact not many of us are familiar with. The big idea behind medical microcurrent is that the extremely low level of cellular energy we normally maintain in good health can be replicated by a medically attuned machine and applied during therapy sessions to return our cells to a more vital status. Medical microcurrent is a fascinating area of alternative health with anecdotal results that range from pain relief in conditions as various as migranes and surgery recovery to arthritis and fibromyalgia.

We are certainly not qualified to report on this alternative modality’s efficacy on a medical level (and you should always consult your physician before trying anything health related), but we are certainly curious enough about the modality’s too-good-to-be-true promises to experiment with the treatments on ourselves and report back!

Here’s what we learned from Mila and a little bit about our own incredible results with the therapy…

on microcurrent therapy: According to Mila, “Our entire body is electrical. Heart, brain, neurotransmitter function, etc. Microcurrent emulates our electrical properties precisely. The body runs on 500 microamps, which is exactly what I introduce back into the body to ‘reboot’ the cellular electrical system.”

“Microcurrent allows the body to return to homeostasis, whether that balance was lost through stress, environment, aging, diet, exercise or mental imbalance. During a treatment session, ATP, adenosinetriphosphate, which is the energy chemical for all cell function, is increased by 500%.”

Mila tells us there are three overarching benefits to microcurrent treatments that make the therapy so widely effective.

The number one medical benefit is a decrease in inflammation in the body – significantly and prolifically. This helps stave off disease, as all diseases begin with inflammation. In addition, other cellular changes occur during microcurrent: cell turn over occurs more quickly at the germative layer and there is an increase in Gluconeogenesis – basically the body utilizes glucose more efficiently and helps stabilize blood sugar. (One study I refer to proved a stabilization of 12 insulin dependent diabetics after 6 weeks.) Lymphatic drainage, blood flow, protein synthesis, nutrient transport across the cell membrane, metabolism and brain neurotransmitter activity are also all increased by microcurrent.”

Why we tried it: There are many energy-related therapies are out there in the natural wellness world and many have found relief and comfort through them. Whether it be TENS units designed to address nerve pain or the healing hands of a reiki pracitioner. When we heard that Mila was using microcurrent to rejuvenate the body and heal pain, there was something that intuitively struck us about it.

What we experienced: We visited Mila for eight sessions of her microcurrent facial. Just by receiving current during the facial, Mila says that the entire body benefits from the balancing effects of the current – a subtle, but palpable calming and rejuvenating effect. Laying under Mila’s double magic wands one afternoon, and after hearing dozens of her stories about clients who’d just left the office – coming in for facials, then dragging in ailing family members to address post-surgical healing, headaches, depression, arthritis, even fibromyalgia – we decided to try the therapy for ourselves. Our experience with Mila’s facials gave us good reason to hope in microcurrent’s promised ability to reduce pain, heal inflammation in the body and address a wide-range of conditions with inflammation as the root cause.

A lingering chronic shoulder strain was causing daily pain. Mila and her assistant got to work for over twenty minutes targeting the area with both current wands. Over the course of the therapy the skin over the inflamed muscle and nerves turned red over very specific areas only, revealing the most inflamed trouble areas and helping Mila target the areas of need more specifically. Edges of scientific acceptance or no, we left Mila’s office pain-free for the first time in months, as she claims so many of her other clients do as well.

The treatment was painless, although the current can be felt – invitingly so. Whether it’s to rejuvenate facial tissue or relieve muscle pain, the current feels absolutely therapeutic. And has zero side effects.

What do you think? We’d love to see new medical research on this therapy and others like it that are providing so much experiential evidence through alternative health practioners around the country. As attitudes about natural health continue to shift we wonder if more side effect-free, affordable treatments like microcurrent will ever become the new norm.

Will the medical research community allocate more time and funds to therapies like this one? It’s a broad topic, to be sure, but one worth discussing here with our community. We’d love to hear from you in the comments below. Have you ever had a personal healing experience with natural or alternative healing modalities like medical microcurrent? Do you think these types of therapies are catching on?

The Chalkboard Mag and its materials are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. 
All material on The Chalkboard Mag is provided for educational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified healthcare provider for any questions you have regarding a medical condition, and before undertaking any diet, exercise or other health related program. 


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  1. I’ve been considering getting a NuFace for micro current therapy at home. Could you please address these at-home devices in a future article? Thanks — love The Chalkboard Magazine!

    tina | 02.23.2017 | Reply


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