8.2.17

Keeping up with that Kondo way of life is easy — once you know what needs to be done daily. At least, that’s what Marie Kondo herself recently told us – and we’re sticking to it.

This (adorable) Japanese organizing guru has transformed closets and lives alike with her cult-followed bestsellers, The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up and Spark Joy, showing us how to command joy by killing clutter. Marie taught us that if we don’t love it, we should get rid of it; and if we do love it, we should fold it and make it looks pretty. While the Kondo Method requires a little time and attention to put into practice initially (just ask a friend who’s tried it!), the upkeep can be a very simple, calming part of our daily routine.

We were thrilled to talk to Marie about this very subject as she launches her third book: a graphic novel that brings her method to life through the story of a woman who transforms her life using Kondo’s technique. Try her simple tips below to keep your home – and your life – in a more joyful state…

5 Things You Should Do Daily According To Marie Kondo

Bring Fresh Air into Your House

First thing in the morning, invigorate your home by opening all the windows to let in fresh air. This serves as a “good morning” greeting to your house and to yourself.

Sip what sparks joy each morning

Whether it’s hot water, herbal tea, sparkling water, etc., decide what you wish to drink first thing in the morning, depending on your mood and what “sparks joy.” By becoming more conscious about the the “joy” your body is seeking, you will be able to be more conscious about what sparks joy for you throughout the day.

Give Thanks to Your Belongings

When you return the jacket you wore or the bag you used to your closet at the end of the day, do so with gratitude, saying, “Thank you for supporting me today.” You can, of course, say this out loud.

Return Each Belonging to Its Designated Place

Before you go to sleep, reset your mind and body by returning each belonging to its designated place. (It may be difficult, but it’s ideal if you can do this before you leave your house every morning too).

Reflect at The end of The day

At the end of the day, reflect on what sparked joy for you that day. It can be anything – including people you meet or events that occurred.

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  1. I only just read Marie’s book a few weeks ago and started putting things in to practice, but I would have to agree that once you have things done it’s a lot easier to spend a little bit of time each day just clearing up.

    Lillian | 08.02.2017 | Reply
  2. Please sign me up for newsletter

    Molly | 08.02.2017 | Reply
  3. I think calling a guru adorable sounds a bit sexist to me. You would never write like that about a man, would you?

    Betty | 08.02.2017 | Reply
  4. Depends, does he look and behave like Marie Kondo? If so, I definitely would. In fact, I’d love to meet him.

  5. I agree with Betty that it’s sexist. I don’t care about whether Kondo is adorable, or whether she looks and behaves adorably, or what she looks like, or whatever. Adds nothing to the story and feels diminishing IMO. I’d rather the focus be on her books or her accomplishments. And no–I wouldn’t want to meet a man just b/c he’s adorable. Ugh.

    Becca | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  6. I agree, it tends to happen to people who are of Asian descent. I am Japanese and am small and thin so for some reason. Adorable and honey are what I hear most often although my friends who are Caucasian get referred to by their names.

  7. I think it’s a stature thing. I’m Caucasian but petite, and I get called adorable and cute, even at work! One time in a meeting, a woman referred to me as Polly Pocket and said she wanted to carry me around with her. I mind it less in a personal setting than a professional one so I think it’s up to Ms. Kondo only to decide whether or not she’s offended.

  8. Sexist perhaps but sometimes adorable is adorable and political correctness can often take the joy and spontaneity out of just about any description that was made with no malicious intent. Take a breath and perhaps accept that not every written word needs to be dissected. I think Kondo can be the judge here.

    diana | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  9. good grief why do people have to be offended by EVERYTHING, if you don’t like it move on, just like at the grocery store, I don’t like yellow apples so I walk right by them and get the red……………oh the horror!

    CLS | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  10. I enjoyed the article, her inspiration and guidance. Thank you for featuring her and the practices. Much appreciated!

    Erin | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  11. I would most certainly call a male guru adorable! If a person qualifies as adorable, they are adorable!

    Terry | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  12. Amen!

    Elena Nehles | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  13. Please sign me up for the newsletter – I need this!

    Kathy | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  14. I know what to call some of the people complaining on here…

    Bodina | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  15. Webster defines adorable as “extremely charming or appealing”…..how can this be construed as offensive and sexist?? Why must we always search for what is wrong & not what is right? Oy…

    Jill | 08.03.2017 | Reply
  16. So, no one enjoyed the article? They only read it to complain about what? Someone’s descriptive opinion about someone. If Marie Kondo has not complained or asked for it to be changed, why should you

    Rene | 08.04.2017 | Reply
  17. Newsletter please!

    kim vierkant | 08.04.2017 | Reply
  18. I mean, she’s got a book with a manga version of herself; if that’s not adorable then idk what is

    audrey | 08.04.2017 | Reply
  19. Her methods sound a tad OCD to me. She appears somewhat conservative or reserved. I fail to see the appeal, as I was born into an era when those similar 50s-evocative values & facades were being eroded by the boundless freedoms of the 60s & 70s & all were in awe of Joan Rivers & her belief that a man never yearned for a woman who kept a clean or tidy house.

    Michelle | 08.04.2017 | Reply
  20. My opinion is her practices are rooted in Japanese culture, and should be considered in that light. That said, there is much there that we westerners could benefit from. Nobody including Kondo herself really expects we do things exactly the way she does but the concepts and the attitude are helpful.

    bunny | 08.06.2017 | Reply
  21. I love the article and am grateful that her new book has been shared here. I truly find her methods original and with meaning for those who want to find significance in what they work so hard to obtain. To feel an appreciation for our belongings gives meaning to the energy (work, money, time) that we have invested in them.

    Lydia Boswell | 08.06.2017 | Reply
  22. I have read both of her books. Very simple yet powerful concepts of decluttering to make room for more powerful forces (like joy) in our worlds. She has become a guru of sorts. That would make her adorable (the ability to be adored) for what she offers not for how she looks. No different from all the male gurus that many folks adore.

    Tina | 08.06.2017 | Reply
  23. Finished reading first book asked husband to read. Put method in place Immediately on my clothes. Wondering how to fold table linens, napkins and place mats?

    Elizabeth Quinn | 08.08.2017 | Reply
  24. Really? They only thing you got from this was “sexist”? It is really sad what this country has come to. Can we whine just a bit more?!?! Come on people, I so tired of this way of thinking. Grow up and put on your big girl pants!

  25. just focus on her work and not her “adorableness”.



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